U.S. Military Plane Crashes In Afghanistan; Both Passengers Killed – Forbes

according to NPR, after earlier reports said there were as many as 100 casualties and that the aircraft was a commercial jet.

  • CBS News reported that the aircraft crashed in Ghazni Province, about 100 miles south of Kabul.
  • According to Reuters, a U.S. armed forces spokesperson confirmed that the plane was an E-11A military aircraft, and that there were “no indications the crash was caused by enemy fire.”
  • The Associated Press reported that the U.S. military is investigating the crash, and that it remained unclear to who the aircraft belonged.
  • Local officials initially believed the plane belonged to state-owned operator Ariana Airlines, but a Facebook page supposedly run by the company posted a strongly worded denial.
  • According to CBS News, Afghanistan’s civil aviation authority said it received no reports of a civilian aircraft crashing, which means the aircraft could have been a military or cargo plane.
  • Earlier, Ghazni Province spokesperson Arif Noori told NBC News that there are an estimated 100 bodies at the crash site and that officials are searching for more⁠—but had previously told CBS News that the bodies of two pilots were recovered without mentioning additional casualties.

What to watch for: Noori told CBS News that wintry conditions in the region and Taliban control could hamper efforts to access the crash site. A spokesperson for the Taliban told the BBC that it has not yet located the plane. 

Key background: According to the AP, Afghanistan’s last major commercial crash occurred in 2005, when a Kam Air flight traveling from Herat to Kabul crashed into mountains. The ongoing war in the region has also seen a number of military plane crashes. In 2013, an American Boeing 747 carrying seven service members crashed shortly after takeoff from Bagram air base near Kabul, killing all aboard. An investigation conducted by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) found that military vehicles on board the cargo jet were not secured properly and shifted during the flight, causing damage and making the aircraft “uncontrollable.”

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(Updated: 2:58 p.m. EST, Jan. 27 2020)

Topline: An American military plane crashed Monday in a Taliban-controlled area of Afghanistan, killing both passengers on board, according to NPR, after earlier reports said there were as many as 100 casualties and that the aircraft was a commercial jet.

  • CBS News reported that the aircraft crashed in Ghazni Province, about 100 miles south of Kabul.
  • According to Reuters, a U.S. armed forces spokesperson confirmed that the plane was an E-11A military aircraft, and that there were “no indications the crash was caused by enemy fire.”
  • The Associated Press reported that the U.S. military is investigating the crash, and that it remained unclear to who the aircraft belonged.
  • Local officials initially believed the plane belonged to state-owned operator Ariana Airlines, but a Facebook page supposedly run by the company posted a strongly worded denial.
  • According to CBS News, Afghanistan’s civil aviation authority said it received no reports of a civilian aircraft crashing, which means the aircraft could have been a military or cargo plane.
  • Earlier, Ghazni Province spokesperson Arif Noori told NBC News that there are an estimated 100 bodies at the crash site and that officials are searching for more⁠—but had previously told CBS News that the bodies of two pilots were recovered without mentioning additional casualties.

What to watch for: Noori told CBS News that wintry conditions in the region and Taliban control could hamper efforts to access the crash site. A spokesperson for the Taliban told the BBC that it has not yet located the plane. 

Key background: According to the AP, Afghanistan’s last major commercial crash occurred in 2005, when a Kam Air flight traveling from Herat to Kabul crashed into mountains. The ongoing war in the region has also seen a number of military plane crashes. In 2013, an American Boeing 747 carrying seven service members crashed shortly after takeoff from Bagram air base near Kabul, killing all aboard. An investigation conducted by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) found that military vehicles on board the cargo jet were not secured properly and shifted during the flight, causing damage and making the aircraft “uncontrollable.”

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