June 20, 2021

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Colorado Democrat: Fear of Trump, desire for power ‘overriding’ patriotism in some Republicans | TheHill – The Hill

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Rep. Jason CrowJason CrowSunday shows preview: Infrastructure push revs up White House pressed on evacuating Afghan allies as time runs out On the Money: Tech giants face rising pressure from shareholder activists | House Democrats urge IRS to reverse Trump-era rule reducing donor disclosure | Sen. Warren, Jamie Dimon spar over overdraft fees at Senate hearing MORE (D-Colo.) on Sunday said Republicans’ fear of former President TrumpDonald TrumpWhat you need to know about the international tax talks 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 Biden blasts Texas voting bill: ‘An assault on democracy’ MORE and their desire for power are “overriding” their patriotism “to do what’s necessary for the good of the country.”

When asked by host Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddSenator’s on-air interview features carpooling colleague waving from back seat Kinzinger: ‘I would love to move on’ from Trump but he is the leader of the GOP Crenshaw: Republicans can’t ‘excommunicate’ Trump MORE on NBC’s “Meet the Press” if bipartisanship is “dead on any issue” after Congress could not agree to an independent commission to probe the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, Crow said it is “depressing” that some Republicans will not “do what’s necessary for the good of the country” because of the influence of fear and power.

“You know, I am an optimist by nature,” Crow said. “But that’s being strained right now because, you know, the impact of fear, the fear of Donald Trump, and the impact of power, the desire for power, by certain elements in the GOP is overriding, you know, that patriotism, that desire to do what’s necessary for the good of the country, and it’s, frankly, very depressing,” Crow said.

Crow highlighted House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyThe Memo: Marjorie Taylor Greene exposes GOP establishment’s lack of power Overnight Health Care: Public option plan left out of Biden budget proposal | House Republicans demand congressional probe into COVID-19 origin | Half the total US population have received at least one vaccine dose Senate GOP blocks legislation on Jan. 6 commission MORE‘s (R-Calif.) contrasting comments regarding Trump’s role in the insurrection.

“I remember, actually, very specifically, hours after we had retaken the Capitol and gone in and recertified the election, Kevin McCarthy gets up on the House floor, and we were all sitting there on the House floor. There was still the smell of tear gas and broken glass all over, and he gave this speech about how people held the breach against the mob and made sure that the House chamber hadn’t been taken. He actually called me out by name and several other members,” Crow said.

“Then you fast-forward a couple of months, and it really wasn’t a big deal. It’s all about politics,” he added.

A week after the insurrection, McCarthy said Trump was responsible for the attack. Weeks later, however, he reversed course, saying the former president did not “provoke” the riot.

Senate Republicans on Friday blocked legislation to establish an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in a 54-35 vote.

Only six GOP senators joined Democrats in supporting the legislation: Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump, midterms fuel GOP’s effort to quash Jan. 6 commission Schumer and Collins appear to have heated exchange before Jan. 6 vote White House: Biden ‘remains committed’ to Jan. 6 probe MORE (Alaska), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Marjorie Taylor Greene exposes GOP establishment’s lack of power Schumer and Collins appear to have heated exchange before Jan. 6 vote White House: Biden ‘remains committed’ to Jan. 6 probe MORE (Utah), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate meltdown reveals deepening partisan divide Schumer and Collins appear to have heated exchange before Jan. 6 vote White House: Biden ‘remains committed’ to Jan. 6 probe MORE (Maine), Bill CassidyBill CassidySchumer and Collins appear to have heated exchange before Jan. 6 vote White House: Biden ‘remains committed’ to Jan. 6 probe Pelosi: GOP ‘cowardice’ on Jan. 6 vote makes ‘our country less safe’ MORE (La.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones Portman9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 Trump, midterms fuel GOP’s effort to quash Jan. 6 commission ‘SECURE 2.0’ will modernize retirement security for the post-COVID American workforce MORE (Ohio) and Ben SasseBen SasseBelarus crisis heightens stakes of Biden-Putin summit Schumer and Collins appear to have heated exchange before Jan. 6 vote White House: Biden ‘remains committed’ to Jan. 6 probe MORE (Neb.).

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyWatch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Philly GOP commissioner on censures: ‘I would suggest they censure Republican elected officials who are lying’ MORE (R-Pa.) missed the vote because of a family commitment, but a spokesperson from his office said he would have supported the legislation “with the expectation that the Senate would consider and Sen. Toomey would have supported” GOP amendments.

Even with Toomey, however, the bill did not have the support of the 10 GOP senators needed to advance.

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