October 26, 2021

Global News Archive

News archives from around the world.

Graham opposes short-term debt hike, warns against being ‘held hostage’ to filibuster | TheHill – The Hill

4 min read

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCongress comes to the aid of Libyan people, passing bill ordering probe into war crimes and torture Grisham: Graham ‘was using Trump to mop up the freebies like there was no tomorrow’ White House seeks to flip debate on agenda price tag MORE (R-S.C.) said on Wednesday that he opposes a short-term debt hike being hashed out by Senate leadership and that Republicans shouldn’t be “held hostage” due to concerns that Democrats could change the filibuster. 

Graham, the top Republican on the Budget Committee, is the first Senate Republican to speak out against the tentative deal that is still being worked out by Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLifting the SALT cap could reduce charitable giving 92 legal scholars call on Harris to preside over Senate to include immigration in reconciliation Schumer: Congress needs to raise debt ceiling by end of the week MORE (D-N.Y.) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon Democrats insist they won’t back down on debt ceiling Schumer warns October recess in jeopardy over debt limit fight MORE (R-Ky.). 

“I do not support the Democrats’ reconciliation package and I do not support raising the debt limit to make that level of spending possible. If Democrats want to raise the debt ceiling they can use the reconciliation process,” Graham said in a statement. 

ADVERTISEMENT

A spokesperson for Graham confirmed that he was opposed to a short-term debt hike to December. 

McConnell, as part of the offer from Republicans, said that they would help expedite the reconciliation process if Democrats decided to raise the debt ceiling on their own through the budget rules that let them bypass a filibuster. He also said that Republicans would let Democrats pass a short-term debt hike as long as the short-term extension was to a specific number and not a day. 

Democrats, after a closed-door meeting, vowed that they wouldn’t use reconciliation but indicated that they will take McConnell up on his offer of a short-term debt hike, with Congress currently having until Oct. 18 to prevent a debt default, according to Treasury Secretary Janet YellenJanet Louise YellenOn The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon Democrats insist they won’t back down on debt ceiling Schumer warns October recess in jeopardy over debt limit fight MORE

Schumer and McConnell are now haggling over the size of the debt hike. They’ll also need total buy-in from their colleagues to speed up a vote on the eventual agreement and to sidestep a 60-vote procedural hurdle. If they can’t get that deal, 10 Republicans would need to vote with Democrats to end debate on a short-term debt hike, even though they could all vote against it on final passage. 

The offer from McConnell comes as Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOn The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon Biden indicates he would sign reconciliation bill with Hyde amendment Overnight Energy & Environment — Manchin opens door for .9T to .2T spending bill MORE (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaOn The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon Overnight Energy & Environment — Manchin opens door for .9T to .2T spending bill Democrats insist they won’t back down on debt ceiling MORE (D-Ariz.) were under fierce pressure to support a carveout to the legislative filibuster for the debt ceiling. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Republicans acknowledged that trying to alleviate some of the pressure on Manchin and Sinema impacted their discussions. Senators believe that once a carveout to the legislative filibuster is created for one issue, it will likely be difficult to prevent a similar move on other priorities — such as voting and abortion rights — or the procedure being nixed altogether. 

A member of GOP leadership told The Hill that it was “safe” to say that the pressure on Manchin and Sinema to support changes to the filibuster impacted Republican thinking. 

“There’s a lot of appreciation on this side for the fact that they’ve been willing to stand up for what they say they were for,” the senator said, referring to Manchin and Sinema’s support for the filibuster. 

But Graham, in his statement on Wednesday night, blistered over that strategy, arguing that Republicans shouldn’t be “held hostage or extorted regarding threats to change the legislative filibuster.” 

“When Republicans were in charge of the White House, Senate, and House of Representatives I held firm against any moves to change the legislative filibuster. I never told my Democratic colleagues that ‘Unless you work with me on certain things, I will have to create a carve-out to the filibuster,'” Graham said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“If an expedited reconciliation process is not good enough, then Democrats should own it and change the rules,” he added. 

Graham’s statement could preview headaches for GOP leaders as they try to get their members lined up behind a deal. 

Former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden announces nominations for Arts and Humanities endowments On The Money — Presented by NRHC — Democrats cross the debt ceiling Rubicon Trump endorses Diehl for Massachusetts governor, slams ‘RINO’ Baker MORE also lashed out at McConnell earlier Wednesday over the offer. Graham and Trump were close allies during his time in the White House, and Graham remains in touch with the former president. 

“Looks like Mitch McConnell is folding to the Democrats, again,” Trump said in a statement. “He’s got all of the cards with the debt ceiling, it’s time to play the hand. Don’t let them destroy our Country!” 

Source Link

Leave a Reply

Copyright ©2016-2021 Global News Archive. All rights reserved.