January 24, 2022

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Members of Congress not running for reelection in 2022 – The Hill

14 min read

Dozens of lawmakers have announced they won’t seek reelection in 2022, in what’s expected to be a tough year for Democrats trying to keep their narrow majorities in both chambers of Congress.

Several House members are seeking other offices, such as in the Senate or their state’s governorships. But other lawmakers are citing decennial redistricting and the increasingly toxic environment in Congress in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol as they head for the exits.

Republicans only need to flip five seats to win the House majority in the 2022 midterms.

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So far, 23 House Democrats have indicated they aren’t running for reelection, along with 13 House Republicans.

Across the Capitol, just six senators have said they aren’t running for reelection in 2022: Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrNorth Carolina Democrat Jeff Jackson drops out of Senate race Democrat Jeff Jackson set to exit North Carolina Senate race: report Manchin, Sanders will oppose Biden FDA nominee Califf MORE (R-N.C.), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyMeet Washington’s most ineffective senator: Joe Manchin Black women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal MORE (R-Pa.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanHewitt pushes back on Ohio GOP Senate candidate’s election fraud claims Officials point to Apache vulnerability in urging passage of cyber incident reporting bill The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Uber – Senate debt limit drama ends; Trump legal troubles rise MORE (R-Ohio), Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyGraham warns GOP about Trump’s wrath on debt vote GOP working to lock down votes on McConnell debt deal House approves bill to ease passage of debt limit hike MORE (R-Ala.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenate confirms Rahm Emanuel to be ambassador to Japan Democrats push Manchin on ‘nuclear option’ for voting rights  Congress passes bill allowing for easier National Guard defense of Capitol after Jan. 6 MORE (R-Mo.) and Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyDemocrats mull hardball tactics to leapfrog parliamentarian on immigration Democrats, Republicans call for Biden to support Tibet autonomy Vermont state senator announces bid for Congress MORE (D-Vt.).

Here’s a running list of which lawmakers won’t be seeking reelection.

DEMOCRATS

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1. Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickDemocrats brace for flood of retirements after Virginia rout Two House Democrats to retire ahead of challenging midterms Two senior House Democrats to retire MORE (Ariz.)

Kirkpatrick, 71, announced in March 2021 that she wouldn’t seek another term representing her Tucson-area seat. Kirkpatrick told The Arizona Republic that she is “sort of term-limiting myself” and wanted to spend more time with family. She had taken a leave of absence from the House the year before to recover from alcoholism, but denied that played a role in her decision.

2. Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaLobbying world Democrats brace for flood of retirements after Virginia rout Showdown: Pelosi dares liberals to sink infrastructure bill MORE (Texas)

Vela, 58, said in March 2021 that he won’t seek reelection after serving in the House since 2013. Vela’s district had been considered a Democratic stronghold, but it has been increasingly targeted by Republicans. It had swung at the presidential level from Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWill — or should — Kamala Harris become the Spiro Agnew of 2022? The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Charter Communications – BBB on the ropes Meet the Democrats’ last best hope of preserving a House majority MORE carrying it by 22 points in 2016 to President BidenJoe BidenGoldman lowers 2022 growth forecasts after Manchin says no to BBB Biden’s unending dilemma: Dealing with Joe Manchin The day democracy almost died MORE winning by 4 points. Vela himself won reelection in 2020 by 14 points. The redistricting process further gave Republicans an opportunity to redraw the district along the U.S.-Mexico border so that it could be more competitive.

3. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosAlmost half in new poll expect economy to get worse in next year Democrats race to get ahead of inflation Pressley looking for whoever ‘borrowed’ her Mariah Carey Christmas album MORE (Ill.)

Bustos, 60, announced in April 2021 that she will retire from Congress, after leading the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee during the 2020 election cycle where Republicans ultimately gained seats. Bustos herself only narrowly won reelection by about 4 points in a competitive district that former President TrumpDonald TrumpChile elects millennial who wants to tax the rich as new president The day democracy almost died Trump says he would not impose boycott against Beijing Olympics MORE had carried. By contrast, Bustos had won reelection in 2018 by nearly 25 points.

4. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanLowenthal becomes latest House Democrat to not seek reelection Your must-read holiday book list from members of Congress Democratic lawmaker: Biden’s diplomatic boycott of Beijing ‘does not go far enough’ MORE (Ohio)

Ryan, 48, formally launched a campaign in April 2021 to run for the open Senate seat that will be vacated by Portman’s retirement. Ryan was first elected to the House in 2002 and currently chairs a House Appropriations subcommittee with jurisdiction over legislative branch spending, where he has made efforts to investigate the Capitol Police’s handling of Jan. 6.

5. Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristDeSantis proposes civilian Florida State Guard military force he would control Florida Republicans debate how far to push congressional remap DeSantis officially files paperwork for reelection bid MORE (Fla.)

Crist, 65, announced in May 2021 that he is running to serve again as Florida governor, marking his third gubernatorial run since 2006. The Republican-turned-Democrat was first elected to the House in 2016.

6. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsLowenthal becomes latest House Democrat to not seek reelection Sununu exit underscores uncertain GOP path to gain Senate majority Democrats brace for flood of retirements after Virginia rout MORE (Fla.)

Demings, 64, launched her campaign to challenge Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees How Congress plans to ban goods produced by Uyghur forced labor Rick Scott says White House hung up on him MORE (R-Fla.) in June 2021. Demings, a former Orlando police chief, has become a rising star in the Democratic Party. She was on President Biden’s shortlist of potential running mates in 2020 and later served as one of the House prosecutors during Trump’s impeachment trial after Jan. 6.

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7. Conor Lamb (Pa.)

Lamb, 37, announced in August 2021 that he is running for the open Senate seat in his state. Lamb had only narrowly defeated his GOP challenger by just over 2 points in 2020, after he won a special election in 2018 to represent a district that had been held by a Republican.

8. Ron KindRonald (Ron) James KindDemocrats brace for flood of retirements after Virginia rout Democrats unite to send infrastructure bill to Biden’s desk Billionaire tax gains momentum MORE (Wis.)

Kind, 58, one of only seven Democrats representing a district carried by Trump in 2020, said in August 2021 that he wouldn’t seek reelection. He only narrowly won reelection with 51 percent of the vote in 2020, compared to when he won reelection by nearly 20 points in 2018.

9. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassFor Democrats it should be about votes, not megaphones Proposed California maps put incumbents in jeopardy Bass calls ‘Black pastors’ comment during Arbery trial ‘despicable’ MORE (Calif.)

Bass, 68, a former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, launched her campaign for Los Angeles mayor in September 2021.

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10. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthThe Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Uber – Senate gets busy, except for Build Back Better House approves bill to ease passage of debt limit hike Yarmuth slams Massie for gun-filled family Christmas photo MORE (Ky.)

Yarmuth, 74, the House Budget Committee chairman who was closely involved in Democrats’ crafting of the social spending package, announced in October 2021 that he will retire after serving in the chamber since 2007.

11. David PriceDavid Eugene PriceNorth Carolina Democrat Jeff Jackson drops out of Senate race Democrat Jeff Jackson set to exit North Carolina Senate race: report Overnight Defense & National Security — Biden officials consider more Ukraine aid MORE (N.C.)

Price, 81, who has been in office since 1997 as well as from 1987 to 1995, announced in October 2021 that he won’t seek another term. He currently chairs a House Appropriations subcommittee with oversight of the departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development.

12. Mike DoyleMichael (Mike) F. DoyleHouse passes bipartisan bills to strengthen network security, cyber literacy Texas Democrat Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson announces retirement at end of term Midterm gloom grows for Democrats MORE (Pa.)

Doyle, 68, said in October 2021 that after serving in the House since 1995, “I believe the time has come to pass the torch to the next generation.” He cited discussions with his wife about “how we want to spend our retirement together now that our family is grown” and redistricting that will likely change his Pittsburgh-based district’s boundaries.

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13. Anthony BrownAnthony Gregory BrownKatie Curran O’Malley, wife of former Maryland governor, launches bid for state AG Maryland Democrats target lone Republican in redistricting scheme Hoyer endorses Jazz Lewis for Maryland House seat MORE (Md.)

Brown, 60, who has served in the House since 2017, launched a campaign in October 2021 to serve as Maryland attorney general.

14. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierSpeier endorses California Democrat in race to replace her War of words escalates in House GOP eyes booting Democrats from seats if House flips MORE (Calif.)

Speier, 71, a co-chair of the Democratic Women’s Caucus, announced in November 2021 that she won’t seek reelection after serving in the House since 2008. “It’s time for me to come home,” Speier said in a video announcing her decision. “Time for me to be more than a weekend wife, mother and friend.”

15. G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldNorth Carolina Democrat Jeff Jackson drops out of Senate race Democrat Jeff Jackson set to exit North Carolina Senate race: report DeFazio becomes 19th House Democrat to retire MORE (N.C.)

Butterfield, 74, who has served in the House since 2004, cited a “racially gerrymandered” map drawn by North Carolina’s GOP-led legislature as a factor in his decision in November 2021 not to run for reelection.

16. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchLowenthal becomes latest House Democrat to not seek reelection Vermont state senator announces bid for Congress Vermont Lt. Gov. launches bid for US House MORE (Vt.)

Following Leahy’s retirement announcement, Welch, 74, launched a campaign in November 2021 to succeed him. Welch has represented the state in the House since 2007.

17. Eddie Bernice JohnsonEddie Bernice JohnsonDemocrats press drillers for methane leak data Eddie Bernice Johnson endorses Texas lawmaker for her House seat The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by ExxonMobil – Arbery case, Biden spending bill each test views of justice MORE (Texas)

Johnson, 86, the first Black woman to chair the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, announced in November 2021 that she wouldn’t seek reelection after serving in Congress since 1993.

18. Tom Suozzi (N.Y.)

Suozzi, 59, launched a campaign for New York governor in November 2021 as a “common sense Democrat.” Suozzi’s Long Island-based district backed Biden by 10 points in 2020, but Democrats have faced surprising losses in local elections in the region in 2021.

19. Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioAirlines defend delays, cancellations amid scrutiny from Congress The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – Biden talks up bright side beneath omicron’s cloud DeFazio becomes 19th House Democrat to retire MORE (Ore.)

The 74-year-old chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure announced in December 2021 that his 18th term in Congress would be his last. DeFazio’s district had become more competitive in recent years, but redrawn lines approved by state lawmakers that made it more safely Democratic led him to feel more comfortable retiring. DeFazio said that “I would have felt more obligation to run again” if his district had remained as much of a potential swing seat after redistricting, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting.

20. Alan LowenthalAlan Stuart LowenthalLong Beach mayor announces bid to replace retiring California Rep. Lowenthal The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Charter Communications – BBB on the ropes Lowenthal becomes latest House Democrat to not seek reelection MORE (Calif.)

Lowenthal, 80, said in December 2021 that he wants to spend more time with family after serving in the House since 2013. He has represented a safe Democratic district based in Long Beach, but as of his retirement announcement California had yet to finalize its new congressional map.

21. Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyDemocratic worries grow over politics of SALT cap The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Uber – Omicron tests vaccines; Bob Dole dies at 98 Florida Republicans debate how far to push congressional remap MORE (Fla.)

Murphy, 43, an influential leader of the Blue Dog Coalition and first Vietnamese American woman elected to Congress, announced in December 2021 that she wouldn’t run again after originally unseating a longtime GOP incumbent in 2016. Murphy said she wanted to spend more time with her family but didn’t rule out another future role in public service. “Several years ago, I departed public service by leaving the Pentagon and moving to Central Florida to start my family. I knew then I wasn’t done with public service, just as I know now I am not done with public service,” she said in her video announcement.

22. Albio SiresAlbio B. SiresDemocratic Rep. Albio Sires won’t run for reelection in New Jersey: report The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by National Industries for the Blind – Manchin says no; White House fires back Countering China’s influence in the Caribbean with a second Caribbean Basin Initiative MORE (N.J.)

Sires, 70, who has served in the House since 2006, told the New Jersey Globe that a formal retirement announcement is expected before year’s end. Sires represents a safe Democratic district that Biden won handily in 2020.

23. Lucille Roybal-AllardLucille Roybal-AllardLatino activists flex redistricting muscle after decade of growth Proposed California maps put incumbents in jeopardy First senator formally endorses Bass in LA mayoral bid MORE (Calif.)

The Hill first reported in December 2021 that Roybal-Allard, 80, the chairwoman of a House Appropriations subcommittee overseeing immigration issues, is not planning to seek reelection. Roybal-Allard told the Los Angeles Times in November that she was unhappy with the state redistricting commission’s proposed map out of concerns it doesn’t ensure adequate Hispanic representation.

REPUBLICANS

1. Tom ReedTom ReedGOP infighting just gets uglier Lawmakers who bucked their parties on the T infrastructure bill Democratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse MORE (N.Y.)

Reed, 50, announced in March 2021 that he would not run for reelection after he was accused of sexual misconduct years before. He also stepped down as co-chair of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus. Reed apologized to his family and to the woman who accused him of misconduct, and said he planned “to dedicate my time and attention to making amends for my past actions.”

2. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceGOP braces for brutal primary in Georgia governor’s election A woke military is no defense at all — why Defense bill in current form must not pass Gosar faces increasing odds of censure on House floor MORE (Ga.)

Hice, 61, launched a primary challenge in March 2021 to unseat Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensberger, who defied Trump’s demand to “find” enough votes to overturn the state’s presidential election results in 2020. Trump has endorsed Hice, who has echoed the former president’s false claims of election irregularities.

3. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson Brooks‘Stop the Steal’ organizer testified to House panel about contact with GOP reps in lead-up to Jan. 6 The truth of Jan. 6 is coming to light — accountability will fall to the courts On The Trail: Trump-inspired challengers target GOP governors MORE (Ala.)

Brooks, 67, is running for the open Senate seat that Shelby is vacating. Brooks, who has served in the House since 2011, led the effort in that chamber to challenge the presidential election results on Jan. 6.

4. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinRudy Giuliani becomes grandfather after son welcomes child Rep. Suozzi to run for New York governor House GOP seek to block Biden from reopening Palestinian mission in Jerusalem MORE (N.Y.)

Zeldin, 41, who has represented a Long Island-based district since 2015, announced in April 2021 that he would run for New York governor.

5. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyTrump war with GOP seeps into midterms Nunes retirement move seen as sign of power shift in GOP Nunes resignation sets off GOP scramble on Ways and Means MORE (Texas)

Brady, 66, is term-limited as the top Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee under internal GOP conference rules and announced in April 2021 that he wouldn’t run for reelection. He previously served as the committee’s chairman from 2015 to 2019, including while Republicans enacted their 2017 tax overhaul during the Trump administration.

6. Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversRepublican Mike Carey wins special election for Ohio House seat Shontel Brown wins special election to replace Marcia Fudge in Ohio House district LIVE COVERAGE: Youngkin wins in Virginia; New Jersey governor’s race in dead heat MORE (Ohio)

Stivers, 56, resigned from the House in May 2021 to take a job leading the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. He previously served as chairman of the House GOP campaign arm in the 2018 cycle, in which the party lost control of the chamber.

7. Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddNorth Carolina Democrat Jeff Jackson drops out of Senate race Democrat Jeff Jackson set to exit North Carolina Senate race: report Trump struggles to clear GOP field in North Carolina Senate race MORE (N.C.)

Budd, 50, who has served in the House since 2017, announced in April 2021 that he is running for the Senate. 

8. Vicky HartzlerVicky Jo HartzlerGOP election objectors rake in corporate cash Republicans fret over Trump’s influence in Missouri Senate race Hugh Hewitt pleads with Trump to not endorse Greitens in Missouri MORE (Mo.)

Hartzler, 61, announced in June 2021 that she is running for Senate to fill Blunt’s seat.

9. Billy LongWilliam (Billy) H. LongRepublicans fret over Trump’s influence in Missouri Senate race Your must-read holiday book list from members of Congress Hugh Hewitt pleads with Trump to not endorse Greitens in Missouri MORE (Mo.)

Long, 66, launched his Senate campaign in August 2021, joining a crowded field of candidates.

10. Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezThe clear and present danger of Jim Jordan & Co. Jan. 6 panel subpoenas aides who met with Trump Powell, Yellen say they underestimated inflation and supply snarls MORE (Ohio)

Gonzalez, 37, was one of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. His state’s party committee subsequently voted to censure him and Trump endorsed a primary challenger. In September 2021, Gonzalez cited “the current state of our politics, especially many of the toxic dynamics inside our own party” as “a significant factor” in his decision not to seek reelection.

11. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel Kinzinger Sunday shows preview: COVID-19 cases surge amid omicron wave Trump allies urge McCarthy to remove Kinzinger, Cheney from House GOP conference Biden says Meadows ‘worthy of being held in contempt’ MORE (Ill.)

Kinzinger, 43, another House Republican who voted to impeach Trump, has become one of his party’s most vocal critics for continuing to embrace the former president. Aside from the prospect of a primary challenge, Kinzinger also faced tough odds for reelection because of redistricting. In a video announcing his decision in October 2021 not to run for reelection, Kinzinger lamented the rise of political tribalism and how “our political parties only survive by appealing to the most motivated and the most extreme elements within it.”

12. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertHouse Ethics panel dismisses security screening fine issued to GOP lawmaker Crenshaw slams House Freedom Caucus members as ‘grifters,’ ‘performance artists’ GOP Rep. Clyde racks up K in mask fines MORE (Texas)

Gohmert, 68, a former judge, announced in November 2021 that he is running for Texas attorney general, joining a crowded GOP primary.

13. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesLowenthal becomes latest House Democrat to not seek reelection Trump media company inks deal with video platform Rumble The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Uber – Debt limit maneuvers; Biden warns Putin MORE (Calif.)

Nunes, 48, announced in December that he would step down at the end of 2021 — a year before the end of his term — to serve as CEO of Trump’s new media company. Nunes had served as the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee since 2015 and was in line to succeed Brady to helm the Ways and Means panel had he remained for another term in the House. 

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