June 12, 2021

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White House: Biden committed to codifying Roe v. Wade regardless of Miss. case | TheHill – The Hill

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The White House says President BidenJoe Biden28 Senate Democrats sign statement urging Israel-Hamas ceasefire Franklin Graham says Trump comeback would ‘be a very tough thing to do’ Schools face new pressures to reopen for in-person learning MORE is committed to codifying the outcome of Roe v. Wade regardless of how the Supreme Court rules after the justices agreed to hear arguments over a Mississippi law that bans virtually all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

Press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiLawmakers bicker over how to go after tax cheats Colonial breach underscores concerns over paying hackers French police deploy tear gas on protestors supporting Palestinians in Paris MORE declined to weigh in on the high court taking up the case, but denounced how “the right to health care, the right to choose, have been under withering and extreme attack, including through draconian state laws” over the last four years.

“And the president and the VP are devoted to ensuring that every American has access to health care, including reproductive health care, regardless of their income, ZIP code, race, health insurance status or immigration status,” she added. “As such, the president is committed to codifying Roe regardless of the … outcome of this case.”

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The Supreme Court said it would take the case on the Mississippi law after it was struck down twice by lower courts. In 2019, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit held that the state’s restriction placed an unconstitutional burden on a woman’s right to terminate an unwanted pregnancy before viability. 

Last term, a 5-4 Supreme Court majority voted to block a Louisiana abortion limit, with Chief Justice John Roberts casting the deciding vote alongside Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgJudge Judy on expanding Supreme Court: ‘It’s a dumb idea’ Court watchers buzz about Breyer’s possible retirement Five hot-button issues Biden didn’t mention in his address to Congress MORE and the court’s three other more liberal justices.

But the court has undergone an ideological shift since then, with Ginsburg’s death and replacement by Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettJudge Judy on expanding Supreme Court: ‘It’s a dumb idea’ Court watchers buzz about Breyer’s possible retirement Five hot-button issues Biden didn’t mention in his address to Congress MORE giving conservatives a 6-3 majority and throwing the future of long-standing abortion protections into question.

The Mississippi law is among hundreds of abortion restrictions that have been introduced recently in state legislatures across the country. In 2021 alone, more than 500 abortion restrictions, including nearly 150 bans, were introduced in 46 states, according to the Guttmacher Institute. Of those, just over 60 measures have been enacted.

It’s unlikely Congress will pass a law cementing the precedent set by Roe v. Wade into law, as it would require at least 10 GOP senators to vote with all 50 Democrats and independents. Only Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCDC’s about-face on masks appears politically motivated to help a struggling Biden Bipartisanship has become a partisan weapon Romney: Capitol riot was ‘an insurrection against the Constitution’ MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRomney: Capitol riot was ‘an insurrection against the Constitution’ Senate panel deadlocks over Biden pick to lead DOJ civil rights division Senate GOP dismayed by vote to boot Cheney MORE (Alaska) have made clear their support for the law.

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